Category Archives: Uncategorized

Documenting Deposits

P1190587One aspect of our work involves the documentation of finds through photography and drawing.

After fully exposing the deposit (above) to see its full extent, we photographed the deposit with overhead shots and close-ups.

P1190557Then William and Mark began drawing a plan of the deposit (above), which included roof slate, red bricks, mortar, stone chips, and pebbles. The meter screen, seen above, assists archaeologists in drawing an accurate plan. In this case, the students are leveling the screen, using a plumb bob and a tap to accurately plot the features of the deposit on a 1:20 plan.

Finally, we removed the deposit so that we could count and process the deposit to see if we could determine what period the deposit was made. Three features point to the deposit reflecting the 19th century house: 1.) The pebbles underneath are consistent with those used for leveling a walkway, that gave entrance to the front of the house. 2.) The mortar's composition has larger inclusions than the finer concrete and mortar found in the first week, which dates to the 1936 house. 3.) All the nails found in the deposit are 19th century cut nails.

Since the house was remodeled in 1936, it is possible this rubble reflects changes made to the house then. The entrance also shifted from an east entrance on N. Wittenberg, to a north entrance on West College. See the two houses below:

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View west across North Wittenberg Avenue to the house. Notice the steps leading up the rise to the house.

Remodeled Georgian House after 1936 at 203 West College.

Remodeled Georgian House after 1936 at 203 West College.

Writing Final Reports

We have discovered individuals, their families, their travels, their illnesses, and the nails, slate, mortar, limestone, and paint chips that once made up the home and property that they owned. This is nearby archaeology at its best. We hope that you will explore this site to discover what we have learned about Lot 3777. It is now just a 50 x 150 feet lot without a house.

May Term 2013 Participants, Excavators and Authors:  Mark Swope, Deanna Iwanyckyj, William Hennigan, and Caitlin Lobl.

May Term 2013 Participants, Excavators and Authors:
Mark Swope, Deanna Iwanyckyj, William Hennigan, and Caitlin Lobl.

We ended our May Term class by finishing excavation reports and profiles on the homeowners. Some of the exploration will continue this summer on site and with internships this fall to further process the material and investigate the women of Alpha Xi Delta who lived in the house from 1919-1992. We also hope to gather some photo documentation and accounts from the Phi Kappa Psi fraternity who lived there unitl 2009. Final day Writing up Reports

Tracking Down Ella I. MacMillen (McMillen) at Marietta College’s Special Collections

Ella I. MacMillen and Francis R. MacMillen  Source: Courtesy of Marietta College Special Collection  Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom

Ella I. MacMillen and Francis R. MacMillen
Source: Courtesy of Marietta College Special Collection
Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom

Ella I. MacMillen (McMillen) holds the deed to Lot 3777 from 1898 until 1905. While she did own the property, she did not reside in the house often as she was frequently abroad from 1895-1920. Instead her husband and two of her three sons (Charles and Samuel), lived at 219 Ferncliff at least from 1892-1896.

 Marietta College’s Special Collections holds a marvelous collection of family letters, photographs and concert performance material associated with the famous violinist Francis Rea MacMillen, one of Ella's three sons. In one photograph you see Ella and a young Francis, likely around the time they moved to Springfield in the mid 1890′s. The family moved here so Francis could take violin lessons. He would quickly become known across Europe and America for his talents.

His family's home in Marietta still stands today on the campus of Marietta College and was commemorated with a plaque by the DAR. IMG_1034

Ella and Samuel MacMillen's house in Marietta, Ohio. Today it is on the campus of Marietta College. Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom 2013

Ella and Samuel MacMillen's house in Marietta, Ohio. Today it is on the campus of Marietta College.
Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom 2013

Ella McMillen. Photo undated. Source: Courtesy of Marietta College Special Collections. Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom, 2013

Ella MacMillen.
Photo undated.
Source: Courtesy of Marietta College Special Collections.
Photo: D. Brooks Hedstrom, 2013

New Helpers Today

Today the Wittenberg University's “Archaeological Field Methods” class was visited by some students from Nightengale Montessori. They came to help observe what we are doing and to participate. They helped sort finds, scrape soil, and screen the collections. We appreciated their help and wonderful enthusiasm!

photo-7The students also knew about stratigraphy, how older items are often in lower strata, and that when you dig a pit that you disturb the dating of the materials within the layers!

Memorial Day on Site at Former ΑΞΔ House at Wittenberg

Registration line for David R. Hosterman

Registration line for David R. Hosterman June 1863*

Courtesy of the Wittenberg University Archives

Courtesy of the Wittenberg University Archives

This Memorial Day we will be excavating and honoring the memory of David R. Hosterman, the first private owner of the property at 203 W. College/529 N. Wittenberg Ave. at Wittenberg University. He purchased the lot from Wittenberg College in 1882. He registered for the Seventh Congressional District of Ohio in June of 1863. He was newly married and working as a teacher.

*Source Citation: National Archives and Records Administration (NARA); Washington, D.C.; Consolidated Lists of Civil War Draft Registration Records (Provost Marshal General's Bureau; Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865); Record Group: 110, Records of the Provost Marshal General's Bureau (Civil War); Collection Name: Consolidated Enrollment Lists, 1863-1865 (Civil War Union Draft Records); ARC Identifier: 4213514; Archive Volume Number: 1 of 4.

photo-1This is our last week of Wittenberg University's new May Term intensive courses. Students in Archaeological Field Methods will continue excavating in their units during the day and researching the home owners associated with the site, the AΞD House, during the evenings. Together we will end the course by assembling the results of our research here the Nearby Archaeology site.