OMG there’s an octopus!

Our day began with a long drive through the wilderness we call San Salvador, entertained by a rendition of “Single Ladies,” performed by our very own Dr. Phillips. Needless to say, he was well caffeinated this morning. We finally arrived at Watling’s Castle which was built in the 1780s for a British Loyalist fleeing the United States. San Salvador was known as Watling’s Island until the Bahamas gained its independence in 1973. Now the bare walls make for awesome group picture opportunities. Some of us took this time to perfect our rock climbing skills.

Group picture at Watling's Castle

 

Rock climbing expertise

 

 

Bloggers in front of the Red Mangroves

After another hot truck ride, we swam and floated in the Pigeon Creek estuary, hoping to see a juvenile lionfish and other baby fish that hide among the prop roots of the red mangrove trees. As we continued to fight the current to stand by the beach, Hannah picked up a shell from which a tiny octopus erupted! We then ate lunch in an abandoned vacation home called Ocean House.

Once again we loaded up on the truck and headed out to explore the rocky intertidal zone of Blackwood Bay. Here we flipped over large rocks and found many new, exciting organisms, including a medusa worm, peanut worms, coral crab, sea hare (a sea slug released a cloud of ink after being harassed by Sarah), and snapping shrimp.

JW posing a Coral Crab

After a fantastic day, we headed into Cockburn Town (pronounced “co-burn”) where we were treated to candy bars, cold drinks, and snacks by our professors. Upon arriving back to the GRC in time for dinner, a few of us were lucky enough to witness J-dub’s phenomenal parallel parking skills.

Class tonight consisted of student presentations that taught us more about the fish and echinoderms of San Salvador.

6 days and counting until you see our lovely tanned selves!

Bahama <3

Stephanie, Hannah, and Amanda

PS. Papa Allbee- Please post World Cup Scores in the blog!

-Written by Amanda Allbee ’11, Hannah Clark ’12, and Stephanie Zmina ’12